Sunday, November 14, 2021

Crustless or "Impossible" Gluten-Free Paleo Pumpkin Pie



My friend Heather has a lot of food sensitivities and a very persnickity digestive system. She's been to a ton of doctors, natural digestive specialists, GI specialists, etc.. and still doesn't have clear answers. In our texts over the past week I told her that I was sad that I couldn't really bake or cook for her anymore, because I just didn't know what she could tolerate. 

She said, "I just want pumpkin pie, and I know that YOU of all people can make me a pumpkin pie." 

Well alrighty then Heather... no pressure, no pressure at all! 


Impossible/Crustless Gluten-Free Paleo Pie 1 - made with arrowroot starch & egg yolks

So I quizzed her on all the basic ingredients of a pumpkin pie. What can she have? What can she not have? The base ingredients of any pumpkin pie are pureed pumpkin, sugar, eggs, milk, and spices. 

She said that she could tolerate pumpkin and dairy, but she could only tolerate egg YOLKS - but no whites, and sugar was out. No sugar?? Hmm...  AND she couldn't tolerate most sugar substitutes either, so no stevia, no "Swerve", and definitely no "Splenda". 

"How about maple syrup", I asked? "OOHHHHHHHHHH yes!!", she responded, she could definitely have maple syrup!

So I thought, "Okay, I think I can work with this". I decided to make a "crustless/impossible" pie, because if I was going to make an actual crust, the only flour she can handle in large quantities is cassava flour, a flour that I don't currently have in my pantry.  


 
Impossible/Crustless Gluten-Free Paleo Pie 2 - made with Bob's Red Mill 1-to-1 GF flour & egg whites

I also asked Heather if she could handle arrowroot starch, a grain-free starch.  She said yes,  but in small quantities. So I decided to play with an "impossible" or crustless pie idea. Long ago, Bisquick created a whole series of "impossible" or "magic" casseroles. These casseroles and pies work by adding a little bit of flour or baking mix to the base ingredients of a recipe, and during the baking, a thin but crispy crust magically forms around all around the outside of the pie or casserole. 

I realized years ago that the idea also works great in gluten-free dessert pies. Try out my Almond Joy Impossible Pie or my first crustless pumpkin pie with a pretty pecan edge!

I'm actually sharing three recipes below. One recipe is for a pie made with 3 large eggs, another pie made instead with 6 large egg yolks and another pie made with 6 large egg whites.

That way, whether you can have actual eggs, just egg yolks, OR egg whites... you can STILL make a pumpkin pie. Please note that my recipe is adapted from Elana Amsterdam's Paleo Pumpkin Pie. Also, if you need or prefer an egg-free VEGAN crustless pumpkin pie - try this one from Fat Free Vegan, OR Cheryl Harris' GF Vegan Sweet Potato or Pumpkin Pie


*Crustless or "Impossible" Gluten-Free Paleo Pumpkin Pie 1 - Made with 6 egg yolks (for those with egg white allergies)

This recipe is: gluten-free, no added white sugar, nut-free, can be dairy-free

Printer-friendly recipe: https://tinyurl.com/yaa8vc8n 

Ingredients: 

  • 1/3 cup grain-free starch = arrowroot starch, cassava flour, tapioca starch, or a gluten-free all-purpose baking mix (not paleo) - I used arrowroot starch
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon pumpkin pie spice (OR 1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon + 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg + 1/2 teaspoon cloves)
  • pinch salt
  • 6 egg yolks
  • 3/4 cup "milk" = half & half, coconut milk, or almond milk, or even canned dairy milk - I used half & half
  • 1/2 cup sweetener = maple syrup or honey - I used maple syrup
  • 1 (15 oz.) can canned pumpkin 

Directions: 

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Grease a 9" pie pan and set aside. 
  3. IF MIXING BY HAND: 
  4. In a large bowl, whisk together the grain-free starch of choice, baking powder, pumpkin pie spice, and salt. Whisk until thoroughly combined. 
  5. On top of dry ingredients add in egg yolks, milk of choice, and maple syrup or honey. Again, whisk together until all ingredients are well incorporated and smooth. 
  6. Lastly whisk in canned pumpkin. Continue to whisk until very smooth and well blended. 
  7. IF USING VITAMIX OR HIGH-POWERED BLENDER: 
  8. Add all wet ingredients into blender: egg yolks, milk of choice, maple syrup or honey, and pumpkin. Blend on high or medium setting for a minute or so, until well incorporated. 
  9. Add in dry ingredients: grain-free flour of choice, baking powder, pumpkin pie spice, and salt. Blend again on high or medium setting for another minute or so, until well blended and very creamy and smooth. 
  10. TO BAKE: 
  11. Pour pumpkin pie batter into the greased 9" pie pan, fill pan until it reaches edge. Do not overfill, you can always make pumpkin pie cupcakes with leftover batter!! 
  12. Place pie pan on top of a baking sheet, just in case the pie spills over while baking. 
  13. Bake for 20 minutes at 400 degrees. 
  14. Turn oven down to 350 degrees and bake an additional 20 minutes or until the center of the pie is no longer "jiggly" or a toothpick or knife inserted in the center comes out mostly clean. 
  15. Let cool 20-30 minutes or longer. Serve with whipped topping or whipped cream if tolerated. 

**Crustless or "Impossible" Gluten-Free Paleo Pumpkin Pie 2 - Made with 6 egg whites (for those with an egg yolk allergies)

This recipe is: gluten-free, no added white sugar, nut-free, can be dairy free, can be made paleo-friendly

Printer-friendly recipe: https://tinyurl.com/yaa8vc8n

Ingredients: 

  • 1/3 cup grain-free starch = arrowroot starch, cassava flour, tapioca starch, or a gluten-free all-purpose baking mix (not paleo) - I used Bob's Red Mill 1-to-1 Baking Mix, so my pie wasn't technically paleo
  • 1 tablespoon pumpkin pie spice (OR 1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon + 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg + 1/2 teaspoon cloves)
  • pinch salt
  • 6 egg whites
  • 3/4 cup "milk" = half & half, coconut milk, or almond milk, or even canned dairy milk - I used half & half
  • 1/2 cup sweetener = maple syrup or honey - I used maple syrup
  • 1 (15 oz.) can canned pumpkin 

Directions: 

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Grease a 9" pie pan and set aside. 
  3. IF MIXING BY HAND: 
  4. In a large bowl, whisk together the grain-free starch of choice, pumpkin pie spice, and salt. Whisk until thoroughly combined. 
  5. On top of dry ingredients add in egg whites, milk of choice, and maple syrup or honey. Again, whisk together until all ingredients are well incorporated and smooth. 
  6. Lastly whisk in canned pumpkin. Continue to whisk until very smooth and well blended. 
  7. IF USING VITAMIX OR HIGH-POWERED BLENDER: 
  8. Add all wet ingredients into blender: egg yolks, milk of choice, maple syrup or honey, and pumpkin. Blend on high or medium setting for a minute or so, until well incorporated. 
  9. Add in dry ingredients: grain-free flour of choice, pumpkin pie spice, and salt. Blend again on high or medium setting for another minute or so, until well blended and very creamy and smooth. 
  10. TO BAKE: 
  11. Pour pumpkin pie batter into the greased 9" pie pan, fill pan until it reaches edge. Do not overfill, you can always make pumpkin pie cupcakes with leftover batter!! 
  12. Place pie pan on top of a baking sheet, just in case the pie spills over while baking. 
  13. Bake for 20 minutes at 400 degrees. 
  14. Turn oven down to 350 degrees and bake an additional 20 minutes or until the center of the pie is no longer "jiggly" or a toothpick or knife inserted in the center comes out mostly clean. 
  15. Let cool 20-30 minutes or longer. Serve with whipped topping or whipped cream if tolerated. 

***Crustless or "Impossible" Gluten-Free Paleo Pumpkin Pie 3 - Made with 3 whole large eggs

This recipe is: gluten-free, no added white sugar, nut-free, can be dairy free, can be made paleo-friendly

Printer-friendly recipe: https://tinyurl.com/yaa8vc8n

Ingredients: 

  • 1/3 cup grain-free starch = arrowroot starch, cassava flour, tapioca starch, or a gluten-free all-purpose baking mix (not paleo) - I used arrowroot starch
  • 1 tablespoon pumpkin pie spice (OR 1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon + 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg + 1/2 teaspoon cloves)
  • pinch salt
  • 3 large eggs
  • 3/4 cup "milk" =  half & half, coconut milk, or almond milk, or even canned dairy milk - I used half & half
  • 1/2 cup sweetener = maple syrup or honey - I used maple syrup
  • 1 (15 oz.) can canned pumpkin 

Directions: 

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Grease a 9" pie pan and set aside. 
  3. IF MIXING BY HAND: 
  4. In a large bowl, whisk together the grain-free starch of choice, pumpkin pie spice, and salt. Whisk until thoroughly combined. 
  5. On top of dry ingredients add in eggs, milk of choice, and maple syrup or honey. Again, whisk together until all ingredients are well incorporated and smooth. 
  6. Lastly whisk in canned pumpkin. Continue to whisk until very smooth and well blended. 
  7. IF USING VITAMIX OR HIGH-POWERED BLENDER: 
  8. Add all wet ingredients into blender: eggs, milk of choice, maple syrup or honey, and pumpkin. Blend on high or medium setting for a minute or so, until well incorporated. 
  9. Add in dry ingredients: grain-free flour of choice, pumpkin pie spice, and salt. Blend again on high or medium setting for another minute or so, until well blended and very creamy and smooth. 
  10. TO BAKE: 
  11. Pour pumpkin pie batter into the greased 9" pie pan, fill pan until it reaches edge. Do not overfill, you can always make pumpkin pie cupcakes with leftover batter!! 
  12. Place pie pan on top of a baking sheet, just in case the pie spills over while baking. 
  13. Bake for 20 minutes at 400 degrees. 
  14. Turn oven down to 350 degrees and bake an additional 20 minutes or until the center of the pie is no longer "jiggly" or a toothpick or knife inserted in the center comes out mostly clean. 
  15. Let cool 20-30 minutes or longer. Serve with whipped topping or whipped cream if tolerated. 


Kitchen Notes: 

  • Impossible/Crustless Paleo Pumpkin Pie 1 - Note that this recipe calls for added baking powder, while the others do not. Since this recipe is made around using egg yolks as part of the fat and as a binder, it could end up a bit dense since egg yolks do not do much in the leavening department. Baking powder helps make this pie less dense than it would be otherwise. However, if you want to make the pie FULLY paleo, leave out the baking powder, it will just be a bit more dense. Need something to do with all those extra egg-whites and you're not making Pumpkin Pie #2 here? Check out this post!
  • Impossible/Crustless Pumpkin Pie 2 - In a similar vein, as the first pie can be dense without egg whites, this pie, is more fluffy and almost has more of a cake-like appearance than the yolk pie. I wanted to make this pie for myself, because I didn't know what else to do with 6 egg whites! (AND I love, I mean LOVE pumpkin pie!) Although this post has a ton of great uses for extra egg whites! Need to figure out what to do with extra egg YOLKS? Check out this post! Personally I like to just add them to the next morning's scrambled eggs! 
  • DO NOT OVERFILL YOUR PIE PAN!! If you have leftover pumpkin pie batter/filling - and you probably will, I always do whether I'm using a crust or not... you can make pumpkin pie "cupcakes". Line a cupcake pan with liners, spritz the liners with non-stick spray, and then fill the liners 1/2 to 3/4 full with pumpkin pie batter/filling. If you want to make the tops pretty, add the half of a toasted pecan on top of each "cupcake". Bake at 350 degrees for 15-20 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean. Serve with a big ol' dollop of whipped cream or whipped coconut cream. This is such a cute & fun dessert for kids on Thanksgiving! 


Have a great November ya'll!! 

To share your comments, questions or thoughts about this recipe, please visit me on the GLG Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Gingerlemongirlblog 


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Sunday, October 24, 2021

Small batch gluten-free waffles & gluten-free "bread"


An audio version of this post: 


Hi. Hola!

Wow, it's been a while. Is there an official method of brushing away the cobwebs of an old food blog? 

Things have changed so much since I first started food blogging in 2007. The world is different. Smaller in some ways. Tiktok videos are far more shared and far far more popular than food blogs. (Maybe one day I'll sign up for an account!) Gluten-free is undeniably easier, even if when I buy various gluten-free foods now, I'm masked and moving through the store as quickly as I can. 

I got my masters in library science. I've been working as a medical librarian for a nursing school for the past two and a half years and I love it. We still have way too many cats (and we're okay with that). I've been learning espaƱol via Duolingo and I love learning new words and picking up phrases that I overhear. And I lost my dad to COVID in late December of 2020. And that moment changed my life forever. And I didn't cook (or do much of anything) for a very, very long time. Then sadly, five months later Michael's dad passed away unexpectedly as well. To say we've had a bad few year is seriously beyond an understatement. 

Grief is a strange friend. Sometimes awful. Sometimes amusing. Always close by and always quick to surprise. Sometimes it is a reminder that you have been (and still are) deeply, deeply loved. But I'll save those stories for another day. 


In the past few months, slowly, I have started cooking again. Maybe more importantly though, I've started to find joy in cooking again. And that has been a gift. A much needed gift. 

These quick, easy, and cheap gluten-free waffles have been a mainstay for the past month. I use them for breakfast sandwiches. I use them as "bread" with soups or salads. I even use them as "toast" to eat with breakfast, they are great popped into the toaster. And occasionally I will even actually eat them as waffles with butter and maple syrup. They are cheaper than both frozen gluten-free store bought waffles and gluten-free store bought bread. And they actually taste better. They're crispy on the outside when they're hot, and become a soft sandwich bread when they're reheated. 

If you're like me, you've discovered 1-to-1/cup4cup gluten-free flours. Gluten-free flour blends that are meant to act just like regular, plain, refined, wheat flour. I've used several different brands. I don't have a particular favorite. They all seem to work well so I just buy whatever is cheapest either online or now at local grocery stores (which still boggles my mind since this was NOT possible in 2007!!) So use whichever brand you prefer. 


Small Batch, Easy Gluten-Free Waffles & Quick Bread
Gluten-free, dairy-free, no added sugar
Makes 4-5 small waffles

Dry Ingredients:
1/2 cup gluten-free 1-to-1/cup4cup all purpose baking flour (should contain xanthan gum)
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt

Wet Ingredients: 
1 large egg
1/2 cup non-dairy milk 
1 tbsp. preferred oil, melted butter, or coconut oil

Directions: 
  1. Preheat waffle maker, per machine instructions. 
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, and salt. Make a well in the center of dry ingredients. 
  3. Add egg, non-dairy milk, and preferred oil to the well in the center of dry ingredients. Mix with a fork or a stick blender until there are no lumps. 
  4. Let batter rest for 5 minutes, it will thicken slightly as it rests. 
  5. Pour batter (about 2 tablespoons per waffle) into waffle iron and cook according to machine directions. My small waffle iron makes 2 Belgium-style waffles at one time, and takes about 5 minutes per batch.)
  6. Remove waffles from iron and allow to cool for a few minutes. 
  7. Eat however you want them... as toast with butter, as waffles with butter & syrup, or just as a hot slice of crispy gluten-free bread. 
Kitchen Notes: 
  • Non-Stick Spray (don't use it on a non-stick iron!) - My waffle iron is non-stick. After making this recipe countless times, I realized that the waffles WILL NOT get very crispy if you use non-stick cooking spray on the iron. The waffles DON'T STICK even without using cooking spray on my non-stick pan, which makes cleaning a breeze. 
  • Eggs: I have not tried this using egg substitutes so I have no idea how it would work. Sorry. 
  • Gluten-Free 1-to-1/cup4cup all purpose baking flours - I have used Bob's Red Mill brand, the Cup4Cup brand, the King Arthur Measure for Measure brand, and a couple that I'm not even sure what brand they were... but ALL of them have worked with this recipe. So I'm pretty sure whatever brand you use will work.
  • Sweet Waffles: Many of the recipes I originally tried for gluten-free waffles called for adding vanilla and sugar to the dough. Sometimes cinnamon. All of these options are fine, they make for a good waffle... however, I really like this plain waffle because it's SO versatile not just as a waffle, but as a quick & easy gluten-free bread. If you want to try a sweeter waffle add 1/2 teaspoon vanilla and 1 tablespoon of sugar. 
  • Doubling & Tripling the recipe: I've done both, multiple times... it always works. Sometimes on Sundays I'll make a triple batch and end up with about 16 waffles to use as bread all week. I also make them ahead of time to make breakfast sandwiches for traveling. 
  • Cost: No, I haven't done a real cost analysis... but generally I pay about $12 for a 4 pound bag of this all-purpose flour and I can't imagine how many waffles that bag will make. A lot. A box of GF waffles from the grocery store can be anywhere from $5-$7 dollars depending on the brand. A loaf of GF bread from the grocery store will cost at least $7-$8 for one loaf. I promise you that even with the labor, cleaning (there's not much), additional ingredients, and electricity involved... these are cheaper, much cheaper. And easy. And honestly better than any brand of bread I've bought! 
Still have a comment or question? Find me on the GLG Facebook page

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Sunday, July 23, 2017

Small Batch Peach Scones from In Jenny's Kitchen


The first recipe I ever tried from Jenny was peanut butter pie. Her husband had passed away and she was trying to find ways to honor his memory. So we made peanut butter pie. His favorite.

I've followed Jenny's journey through the past few years and I admire her resilience, tenacity, and willingness to share her personal struggles. I also love her writing style. One day, when her daughters are older, I believe they will treasure the love she has so beautifully penned through the trials and transitions in their lives after the death of their father.

Scones have been a hot topic among my foodie co-workers lately. Kerry and Elizabeth have both been gushing over a recipe for whole wheat ricotta scones shared from Smitten Kitchen several years ago. So when Jenny shared a small batch recipe for peach scones last week, I really wanted to try them.  I love that the recipe is for a small batch. There are only two humans in our immediate family  (yep, the furrbabies are absolutely family)... and Michael isn't a huge baked goods fan (unless it's chocolate cake, brownies, or his favorite chocolate chip cookies!)... so when I find a small batch recipe, it's a great option for us!

Peaches are in season right now and I just happened to find a few perfectly ripe ones at the grocery store this morning. I made Jenny's recipe with a few basic adjustments to what I had on hand... and of course, made gluten-free.

Small Batch Peach Scones
Slightly Adapted from In Jenny's Kitchen
Makes 4 large scones
Gluten-Free, Vegetarian

  • 1 peach, peeled & cut into small cubes
  • 1/4 cup + 1 tablespoon sugar, divided
  • 1 cup Bob's Red Mill 1-to-1 Gluten-Free Baking Flour, plus extra for shaping
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons cold butter or shortening, cut into small bits
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 3 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon sour cream or heavy cream 
  • Additional sugar for sprinkling on top

Directions
  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place the peach cubes in a small baking dish and sprinkle with 1 tablespoon of sugar. Roast the peaches for 10 minutes until they are fragrant and a bit jammy. 
  2.  In a medium bowl whisk together 1/4 cup sugar, the gluten-free flour, baking powder, and salt. 
  3. Cut the butter into the dry ingredients with a fork or a pastry/dough blender
  4. In a smaller bowl, mix together the egg yolk and sour cream or heavy cream. Pour into the dry ingredients and mix into a sticky dough. If your dough is too dry and crumbly, add milk 1 tablespoon at a time until it's a shape-able dough. 
  5. Add the roasted peaches and mix evenly through the dough. 
  6. Sprinkle additional gluten-free flour onto a board or parchment paper and pour the dough out onto the floured surface. 
  7. Shape the dough into a thick circle or a really large biscuit. Using a sharp knife, cut the dough into 4 scones. 
  8. Place the 4 scones onto a greased or parchment lined baking sheet. Sprinkle the scones with the additional sugar, if you have large grained natural cane sugar all the better, but plain sugar is fine too. 
  9. Bake for 12-14 minutes until golden brown and eat warm :-) Enjoy!



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Sunday, July 9, 2017

Snickerdoodles


This summer my grad school program decided to offer classes in 2, 5-week summer sessions. I decided to stick with one class during the first summer session, (please don't ever make me take a research methods and statistics class in 5 weeks again...) which means I actually have the rest of the summer to chill... and bake!

I started the weekend by making a traditional flan recipe for a dinner party. The hardest part to me was caramelizing the sugar (I tried the recipe twice and it's gonna take some practice)... however it was delicious and devoured at the party, so win win.

After the dinner party, we were sent home with leftovers of chicken ropa vieja and scratch black beans. Such good food! Send your guests home with leftovers and they'll love you forever!

However, when you're sent home with leftovers, it means you have a dish to return. And being raised with good southern manners, I like to return a dish filled with treats.. Which gave me a good reason to crack out the mixing bowls and make cookies!

I debated what kind of cookies to make our friends. I thought about the classic chocolate chip, my favorite peanut butter... but for some reason snickerdoodles kept coming to mind. Snickerdoodles are old fashioned simple vanilla cookies that are coated with cinnamon and sugar.

They were some of the first cookies I learned to make as a child, and there's just something cozy and warm about them. They are the perfect cookies to pair with a hot cup of tea and a good book. Cliched maybe, but a good "librarian" cookie!


Snickerdoodles
free of gluten, dairy, and soy
adapted from the recipe in Southern Living Christmas Cookies c. 1986, pg. 62
makes 24 cookies

Wet Ingredients
  • 1/2 cup shortening
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
Dry Ingredients
Coating Ingredients
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon cinnamon 

Instructions: 
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. 
  2. Line a sheet of parchment paper on a cookie sheet
  3. In a small bowl mix together the coating ingredients and set aside. 
  4. In a medium mixing bowl cream together the shortening with the sugar. Add the egg & vanilla extract and stir until smooth and creamy. 
  5. In a separate bowl whisk together all dry ingredients. 
  6. Stir the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients until fully incorporated. The dough will be firm, but not dry. 
  7. Roll the dough into balls by teaspoons. Roll the balls into the coating mixture and place on a baking sheet 1" apart. 
  8. Flatten the cookies into circles with the bottom of a glass. 
  9. Bake 6-8 minutes until cookies are golden. 
  10. Remove cookies from oven and allow to cool COMPLETELY before removing from the pan. They are fragile and will break if you don't allow them to cool completely!
  11. Enjoy with a cup of hot tea or a big tall glass of milk! 


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Saturday, February 18, 2017

A Brave New World...


Dear fellow non-Tr*mp supporting Americans,

I know it's hard right now. I feel it deep down to my bones every single morning. With a deep sigh and a slight headache I wonder what I'm going to face in each morning's newspaper.

It's a scary time right now. And as my friend Cheryl said, 'this is new to all of us" and I'm still not exactly sure how we move forward. We can fight, we can stay informed, we can make amazing signs and participate in history-making marches, we can write blog posts, we can make the time to write or call our state and local legislators to make sure our voices are heard (in addition to voting of course)... but all of this especially for introverts is exhausting.

I'm not only an introvert, but one who is also highly sensitive... a term I'm not entirely comfortable with, because it sounds like I can't handle anything, I can't take any type of criticism, etc... but what it really means is that I'm extremely aware of the energy, vibrations, emotions, and changes around me.

  • It means there are days I can't handle lights, noises, or even things like the electricity of a tv being on. 
  • It means I can only wear certain types of clothing because fabrics that rub my skin the wrong way could make my entire day miserable. 
  • It means I hate being in a crowd and I love one-on-one company, but even then I can be completely drained after an hour or two. 
  • It means I get where my dog is coming from on most days and how she responds to my energy. 

I also realize this sounds like nonsense to a lot of people, but if this sounds familiar to you, or you're interested in understanding more about highly sensitive personalities, please visit Elaine Aron's site. And more to the point it helps explain how basically this whole political thing has been a huge challenge, because I feel that justice, simple decency, human rights, and basic democracy are being violated every single day... and therefore my beliefs and my rights are being violated every single day. So it's hard. There are days it seriously sucks.



This image has been popping up in my Facebook feed a lot lately. And right now, it basically feels like my life. I want to be informed, I want to know what's going on and I want to be up to speed on what's going to happen to our country. The thing is... none of us really know... and no matter how informed I am, I'm not going to know exactly what's going on. This administration is moving so quickly and with such bewilderingly little wisdom or thought, that I just can't keep up on a daily basis.

So I'm still learning how to do this. I'm still learning how to wake up every day in the country we're in, with the administration at hand, and still go about my day like it's just "another day." Because even just saying that feels like giving up or giving in or simply being complacent.

However, I'm also learning that it's not complacency. Being complacent means not caring at all, pretending it's not happening, and not being willing to participate in making changd. And I care about the future of our country more than I've ever cared before. Ever. I can honestly say before November 7, 2016 I was somewhat complacent, however after, I never will be again.

So how do we do this? How do we keep on living in the midst of fear, in the midst of instability, and in the midst of a country that's changing every single day?

Emma says hi... she'd really like a bone
and she wishes you wouldn't
worry so much...  because it makes

her worry too, and she's an A+ worrier :-p

I honestly don't know yet. But I'm trying. And I'm learning that self-care right now is more important than ever. So the next few weeks I'm going to lay low with social media. With two grad school classes (which probably is a blessing in disguise right now) I'm going to focus on what I can.

I also eventually plan on reading Aldous Huxley's classic "A Brave New World" which I've heard much like Margaret Atwood's "A Handmaid's Tale," as it relates to so much of what we've been going through the past year and a half.

So what about YOU? How are you coping? Are you okay? What are you doing to take care of yourself these days. I'd love to know what types of self-care are working well for you. 

We're all in this together. Please know you're not alone. 






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